Abstract

Introduction: Public and occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields due to the growing trend of electronic devices may cause adverse effects on human health. This paper describes the risk of mutation and sexual trauma and infertility in masculine sexual cell by mobile phone radiations.

Methods: In this study, we measured the emitted dose from a radiofrequency device, such as switching high voltage at different frequencies using a scintillation detector. The switching high voltage power supply (HVPS) was built for the Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) system. For radiation dosimetry, we used an ALNOR scintillator that can measure gamma radiation. The simulation was performed by MATLAB software, and data from the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) were used to verify the simulation. 

Results: We investigated the risks that result from the waves, according to a report by International Commission on Non Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), to every organ of the body is defined by the beam and electromagnetic radiation from this electronic device on people. The results showed that the maximum personal dose over a 15-min period working at the mentioned HVPS did not exceed 0.31 µSV/h (with an aluminum shield). So, according to other sources of radiation, continuous working time of the system should not be more than 10 hours. Finally, a characteristic curve for secure working with modules at different frequencies was reported. The RF input signal to the body for maximum penetration depth (δ) and electromagnetic energy absorption rate (SAR) of biological tissue were obtained for each tissue.

Conclusion: The results of this study and International Commission of Non Ionization Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) reports showed the people who spend more than 50 minutes a day using a cell phone could have early dementia or other thermal damage due to the burning of glucose in the brain.

 

Keywords: Radiofrequency, Mobile Phone, Radiobiological Effects, Mutation, ICNIRP
 
» HTML Fulltext    » PDF Fulltext    » doi: 10.19082/2542

Latest Issue:

In October-December 2018, the journal publishes several original research, including an outstanding Prospective Cohort Study, some experimental studies, and an editorial on a topic of current interest in today’s medical research. Read more:


 

The 6th World Conference on Research Integrity (WCRI) is to be held on June 2-5, 2019 in Hong Kong.

The WCRI is the largest and most significant international conference on research integrity. Since the first conference in Lisbon in 2007, it has given researchers, teachers, funding agencies, government officials, journal editors, senior administrators, and research students opportunities to share experiences and to discuss and promote integrity in research. Read more:


 

TDR Clinical Research and Development Fellowships

Call for applications

Deadline for submission: 7 March 2019, 16:00 (GMT)

TDR provides fellowships for early- to mid-career researchers and clinical trial staff (e.g. clinicians, pharmacists, medical statisticians, data managers, other health researchers) in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) to learn how to conduct clinical trials. Read more:


Meta-Analysis Workshops in New York, USA, and London, UK, in April and May 2019

Don't miss this exceptional opportunity to learn how to perform and report a Meta-analysis correctly. Two Meta-analysis workshops are organized in April and May 2019 by Dr. Michael Borenstein in New York, USA (April 08-10, 2019) and London, UK (May 27-29).

About the Instructor

Dr. Michael Borenstein, one of the authors of Introduction to Meta-Analysis, is widely recognized for his ability to make statistical concepts accessible to researchers as well as to statisticians. He has lectured widely on meta-analysis, including at the NIH, CDC, and FDA. Read more: