Abstract

Background: Simultaneous and rapid detection of multiple foodborne bacterial pathogens is important for the prevention of foodborne illnesses. 

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of 16S rDNA and 23S rDNA sequences as targets for simultaneous detection of eight foodborne bacterial pathogens. 

Methods: Nineteen bacterial oligonucleotide probes were synthesized and applied to nylon membranes. Digoxygenin labeled 16S rDNA and 23S rDNA from bacteria were amplified by PCR using universal primers, and the amplicons were hybridized to the membrane array. Hybridization signals were visualized by NBT/BCIP color development.

Results: The eight intestinal bacterial pathogens including Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Vibrio cholerae, Shigella dysenteriae, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Enterococcus faecalis were appropriately detected in a panel of oligonucleotide array hybridization. The experimental results showed that the method could discriminate the bacterial pathogens successfully. The sensitivity of oligonucleotide array was 103 CFU/ml.

Conclusion: This study showed that 16S rDNA and 23S rDNA genes had sufficient sequence diversity for species identification and were useful for monitoring the populations of foodborne pathogenic bacteria. Furthermore, results obtained in this study revealed that oligonucleotide array hybridization had a powerful capability to detect and identify the bacterial pathogens simultaneously.

 

Keywords: Oligonucleotide array, foodborne pathogens, 16S rDNA and 23S rDNA, Hybridization
 
» HTML Fulltext    » PDF Fulltext    » doi: 10.19082/4405

Latest Issue:

In October-December 2018, the journal publishes several original research, including an outstanding Prospective Cohort Study, some experimental studies, and an editorial on a topic of current interest in today’s medical research. Read more:


 

The 6th World Conference on Research Integrity (WCRI) is to be held on June 2-5, 2019 in Hong Kong.

The WCRI is the largest and most significant international conference on research integrity. Since the first conference in Lisbon in 2007, it has given researchers, teachers, funding agencies, government officials, journal editors, senior administrators, and research students opportunities to share experiences and to discuss and promote integrity in research. Read more:


 

TDR Clinical Research and Development Fellowships

Call for applications

Deadline for submission: 7 March 2019, 16:00 (GMT)

TDR provides fellowships for early- to mid-career researchers and clinical trial staff (e.g. clinicians, pharmacists, medical statisticians, data managers, other health researchers) in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) to learn how to conduct clinical trials. Read more:


Meta-Analysis Workshops in New York, USA, and London, UK, in April and May 2019

Don't miss this exceptional opportunity to learn how to perform and report a Meta-analysis correctly. Two Meta-analysis workshops are organized in April and May 2019 by Dr. Michael Borenstein in New York, USA (April 08-10, 2019) and London, UK (May 27-29).

About the Instructor

Dr. Michael Borenstein, one of the authors of Introduction to Meta-Analysis, is widely recognized for his ability to make statistical concepts accessible to researchers as well as to statisticians. He has lectured widely on meta-analysis, including at the NIH, CDC, and FDA. Read more: